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In celebration of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, we’d like to highlight some of the amazing female leaders at Magnet360, the Mindtree Salesforce Practice!

 

Amy Burstein Senior Director of Talent Acquisition 

Who has been an influential woman in your life or career?   

My mom has been the most influential. She balanced work and a family and encouraged me to do so. She believes I can do anything I put my mind to and I foolishly believe her. 

What advice would you give your younger self?   

Trust your instincts and everything happens for a reason. 

What advice would you give other women considering careers in technology?   

A career in technology is for curious, smart, and problem-solving individuals. If you pick a career that you are passionate about, everything else will follow. 

 

Andrea Dupont | Director of Education and Enablement 

Who has been an influential woman in your life or career?  

My mother is still the biggest influencer. She has modeled so many things that I strive for each day—her incredible work ethic, passion for learning, courage to take risks in life (knowing that fear is just temporary and the reward can be awesome), and not being satisfied because others approve, but because you approve.  

What advice would you give your younger self?  

Speak up and look out for yourself—others can assist, but no one will advocate for you the way you can. 

What advice would you give other women considering careers in technology?  

There is so much opportunity and it is not all numbers and symbols (code). In technology you get to learn about so many industries and businesses, help remove blockers, and solve problems. It is so satisfying to build and see the impact your work has on others.  

 

Diana Eavzan | Senior Director/Head of Commerce  

Who has been an influential woman in your life or career? 

My advisor at University, Mary Fox, was hugely influential in my career and approach to life. She was the Dean of our Business School and had come from being a leading executive in the business world. She was the first strong, whip-smart, warm, yet driven woman (who wasn’t related to me) to believe in me, challenge me, and push me to take on the world. She inspired me with her own achievements and success in business and encouraged me to think of my “basements” (bossy, nerdy) as “balconies” (leader, smart)—far before Lean In existed.  

What advice would you give your younger self? 

Stop hiding your strengths and downplaying your capabilities to protect others’ egos; there’s a way to be confident and strong and celebrate others’ strengths without hiding your own. 

What advice would you give other women considering careers in technology? 

Be confident but know what you don’t know (and that’s a lot). Don’t be afraid to raise your hand, ensure you are continually learning and recognize that if you don’t know how to do something today, you are smart enough to figure it out. I used to be one of those women and I’ve mentored many women who don’t raise their hand for a promotion or don’t apply for positions unless they check 100% of the boxes on the job description. Those are wish lists! If you have at least 50–60% of the responsibilities covered and have a passion for learning, know your strengths and how to apply them—you can master the rest. 

 

Lynne Leaf | Director of Marketing

Who has been an influential woman in your life or career? 

Wow, there have been many! I am surrounded by so many beautiful friends who inspire me every day. Whether they are from childhood, someone I recently met, or someone I just reconnected with after years—they’ve all influenced me in one way or another. These are women who are incredibly accomplished; they have careers, families, and are athletes—plus, they are the most fun people I know. We’ve laughed, cried, and supported each other through it all. 

What advice would you give your younger self? 

Don’t sweat the small stuff, and it’s all small stuff (it’s not just the clever title of a book). Looking back, things that I thought were life and death were not such a big deal. 

What advice would you give other women considering careers in technology? 

If a career in technology is what you think you want, take the leap and explore what’s out there. Build your network with other women in your industry of interest and keep that network warm over time. I’ve worked in several industries over the years and I’ve enjoyed each one for various reasons.  

 

Kari Lessard | Delivery Lead/Partner, North America 

Who has been an influential woman in your life or career?   

Two of the most influential women in my life were my ballet instructors, Rebecca and Leslie. I took ballet lessons starting at age 3 and continued throughout my young adult years. My ballet instruction taught me about self-confidence, the importance of building foundational skills through discipline, continued practice and repetition, and to always keep my chin up. Although ballet and IT delivery are on opposite ends of industry, the lessons and discipline translate beautifully.

What advice would you give your younger self?   

You may think you know your career path, but if you don’t keep an open mind you may not find your true calling.

What advice would you give other women considering careers in technology?   

Seek to understand the business problems you are trying to solve through IT solutions. The desired outcomes and business impact will be greater when you do. It also helps when teams are aligned and working together, rather than against each other. 

 

Stephanie Rivard | Center of Excellence Head, Marketing & Campaign Operations 

Who has been an influential woman in your life or career?  

I have always looked up to my mom, but as each year passes, I have a deeper respect for all she did for our family while owning a business and building her career. 

What advice would you give your younger self?  

Immerse yourself in a variety of technology programs, events, and networking opportunities. There is so much out there, and you may discover that your biggest passions are the least expected. 

What advice would you give other women considering careers in technology?  

Be confident in your abilities, ask questions, and let yourself fail. Don’t miss out on being able to learn, innovate, and grow by staying in your comfort zone. 

 

Christina “Tina” Sherman | VP, Chief Growth Officer 

Who has been an influential woman in your life or career?  

The most influential woman in my life is my mom. She was a teacher for 35 years in city schools in Minneapolis. She changed children’s lives—she may have even saved some. She is beautiful, and brave and even today, at 80, she lights up a room with her energy and smile. She is authentic and awesome.  

What advice would you give your younger self?  

Never let anyone tell you that you can’t do something until you truly decide that for yourself. Don’t be afraid to prove people wrong. I have overcome so many doubters in my life and career. So, my advice is: You decide. No one else decides for you.  

What advice would you give other women considering careers in technology?  

Even with all the focus on equality and diversity, there’s still room to continue to close the gap in the male/female ratios. Tech is definitely a world where inspiring, intelligent women are welcomed and valued and can choose brilliant career paths. I am happy to talk to anyone who is looking to enter this industry.

 

 

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